Thunder Road: More Than A Movie, It’s A Movement

Now into its second week the Thunder Road campaign by Astoria Entertainment still has a long road ahead of them. In support of the campaign the founders of Astoria Entertainment: Steven Grayhm, Charlie Bewley and Matt Dallas have headed out on the road with plans to visit cities not only in the United States, but in Canada and the UK as well. Each new day finds them running themselves ragged trying to spread the word through press interviews, corporate meetings, and fundraising events. And let’s not forget the intrepid endeavors of Charlie’s innovative PR stunt #Sweats4Vets, where each day he jumps rope for hours on end in front of national monuments and corporate buildings.
From its inception Thunder Road has truly been a labour of love, when Steven was inspired to create a script that would truly illustrate the realities veterans face when they return from service. After a life changing road trip in 2011 to research veteran issues, which brought them into contact with many veterans and their families, Steven found greater motivation to have his vision come to fruition. Which brings us to the present, after trying to have Thunder Road produced by traditional means Astoria Entertainment is now asking the public to help fund this important film and allow them to produce the film the way they’ve always intended it.

Thunder Road is the story of returning U.S. soldier SGT. CALVIN COLE (played by Steven) whom we meet in present day Detroit as a troubled veteran who suffers from PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) and tbi (Traumatic Brain Injury) from multiple deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. Initially resistant to the VA system COLE must find a way to assimilate back into civilian life before he ends up dead or in prison.
More than your typical war story Thunder Road aims to bring the human side of war to the screen, PTSD and other mental health issues are continually met with stigma in our society and this film would help create a dialogue and focus on such an important issue. Some may argue that you could be putting the money you donate to this campaign into veteran charities, which is valid, however helping to create this film will allow this issue to reach so many people on a global scale. Steven’s vision of creating a war drama with no political agenda is another way Thunder Road stands apart from its cinematic predecessors. Without the support of the public this film won’t get made, “It’s too real, almost uncomfortable.” says Charlie Bewley, in reference to why mainstream Hollywood hasn’t wanted to produce Thunder Road.

Every donation counts and truly no amount is too small, for as little as $10 you can access all the behind-the-scenes videos that are posted almost daily chronicling Astoria’s road trip, for $100 you can attend private screenings of the film once it’s been made. If you’ve been following the campaign but are waiting to donate there’s no time like the present, if you feel like you don’t have enough to make a difference you’re wrong, if each of Matt and Charlie’s current twitter followers donated $10 to the campaign they would have already surpassed their goal. Beyond the incentives you should support this campaign for its message and for the passion of the three men who are at the helm of this inspiring campaign. Hearing them speak about not only the campaign but of how their own lives have been impacted by the experiences of this journey is reason enough to support them.
More than a movie Thunder Road is a movement, please pledge today.

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2 responses

  1. Pingback: Thunder Road Film: Movie With A Message | Is It Just Me?

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